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02

Sep

Maybe home is nothing but two arms holding you tight when you’re at your worst.”

- Yara Bashraheel

septagonstudios:

Enzo Pérès-Labourdette

septagonstudios:

Enzo Pérès-Labourdette

uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!

Today we will take a walk through 1840’s Philadelphia with City Sights for Little Folks.  This book features illustrations of things you could expect to see on your journey through town, accompanied with brief descriptions and occasional rhymes.  For those of you interested in the history of print, this book was printed via stereotype, a  method of printing  developed in the 18th century to keep up with the rapidly rising demand for books.  With traditional handset type, printers ran into issues when numerous copies of the same text were needed in quick succession.  With movable, hand-set type the compositor had to arrange each word letter-by-letter on the press bed; when dealing with multiple machines running the same text, this method leaves room for lots of errors, and also requires huge volumes of standing type.  A stereotype is a metal cast of multiple forms of type, which can then be used on a press instead of a hand-assembled form.  That way, printers could use several stereotypes to print the same text quickly, without a huge need for more inventory or staff. Thus, this book is an interesting window into history.  It provides a child’s-eye view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century, and also embodies a printing technology that was very popular and significant at the time. 

City Sights for Little Folks.  Philadelphia: Smith & Peck, 1845.  Charlotte Smith Miniature Collection, Uncatalogued.

See all of our Miniature Monday’s posts 

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-Laura H.

Victorian Ladies Bookmarks by Marina’s Wishes.

(Source: bookporn)

purrartbypurrer:

Describe the color red without using the word red.
Red [red]
noun
1. Murder on the sidewalk. My mother’s favorite cherry candy. The sun at ten p.m. on a summer night. Warning, danger. Warning, I love you. Warning, heart like the bloodiest thing you’ve ever seen. Roses. Cranberries. Fire on a beach, fueled with booze and brandy. Fire in an apartment building, fueled with booze and brandy. Fire in your throat. Fire behind your teeth.
2. Her mouth when she kisses you and it tastes like someone else.
http://backshelfpoet.tumblr.com/post/95807115753/describe-the-color-red-without-using-the-word-red

purrartbypurrer:

Describe the color red without using the word red.

Red [red]

noun

1. Murder on the sidewalk. My mother’s favorite cherry candy. The sun at ten p.m. on a summer night. Warning, danger. Warning, I love you. Warning, heart like the bloodiest thing you’ve ever seen. Roses. Cranberries. Fire on a beach, fueled with booze and brandy. Fire in an apartment building, fueled with booze and brandy. Fire in your throat. Fire behind your teeth.

2. Her mouth when she kisses you and it tastes like someone else.

http://backshelfpoet.tumblr.com/post/95807115753/describe-the-color-red-without-using-the-word-red

01

Sep

oldbookillustrations:

Hermia: Emptying our bosoms of their counsel sweet.

William Heath Robinson, from A midsummer-night’s dream, by  William Shakespeare, New York, 1914.

(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Hermia: Emptying our bosoms of their counsel sweet.

William Heath Robinson, from A midsummer-night’s dream, by William Shakespeare, New York, 1914.

(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Oberon: And make him with fair Ægle break his faith.

William Heath Robinson, frontispiece from A midsummer-night’s dream, by  William Shakespeare, New York, 1914.

(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Oberon: And make him with fair Ægle break his faith.

William Heath Robinson, frontispiece from A midsummer-night’s dream, by William Shakespeare, New York, 1914.

(Source: archive.org)

centuriespast:

Hamlet and the Ghost
by Frederick James Shields
Date painted: 1901
Oil on canvas, 60 x 41 cm
Collection: Manchester City Galleries

centuriespast:

Hamlet and the Ghost

by Frederick James Shields

Date painted: 1901

Oil on canvas, 60 x 41 cm

Collection: Manchester City Galleries

stagecoachjessi:

Hamlet’s Soliloquy (1948-2009)

septagonstudios:

Karen Hofstetter
POLKA RAIN

septagonstudios:

Karen Hofstetter

POLKA RAIN